Writing Conferences

Have you ever asked yourself if all those writing conferences or retreats are worth the price tag and hassle?

What if I told you that they were? What if I told you that they are a great place to make new writing friends? What if I told you that you don’t have to spend a fortune?

For the last couple of years, I’ve been a panelist at a southern convention. I’ve also attended AWP and plenty of other writing conferences and retreats. With that in mind, here are my two cents on writing conferences.

For a few bucks you can go from panel to panel and hear writing advice from some of the masters in this craft. They will talk about everything from the basics to the wildest parts of the writing. If you’re feeling brave enough, you can even raise your hand and ask them a question. Either way, it’s nice to hear that even the best writers out there struggle getting their words to do what they want. It’s a great place to restock your writing toolbox with new writing ideas and techniques.

These gatherings are a great place to make new writing friends. So many different kinds of writers, publishers, editors and agents go to things like this and they all want to meet you. All you have to do is walk up to their table and say “hello.” If you’ve got a book you’re hoping to submit, make sure that you come up with an elevator pitch. You never know when a publisher will ask you about your book.

Some of the more famous writing conferences and retreats can be pricey. Start by checking out your local writing resources, and branch out from there. Plenty of writing conferences work by volunteer manpower, so there is often an option to work a couple of shifts at the conference you want to attend in exchange for free admission to the rest of it.

Have any other questions about writing conferences? Leave them below in the comments.

Happy writing.

Creative Spaces

Have you ever asked yourself what a creative space should look like? Over the years my creative space has changed looks many times. Whether you have lots of extra room to set up the full setup or you’ve got a tiny amount of space to call your own, let’s talk about the kinds of things you can do to make your creative space meaningful to you.

Finally got my desk at the BankSimple offices.
  1. You don’t necessarily need a lot of room  to  call  your  own  to  establish  your  creative space. Sure, having loads of extra space to decorate how you wish would be awesome, but it’s not always practical. What you do need is some kind of routine that tells your busy brain that it’s time to focus on writing. You can do this by writing on the same couch cushion or spot at the kitchen table. The amount of space isn’t as important as what you use that space for.
  2. Set the mood for writing. If your brain can think about something other than writing it will. Try making a playlist of writing songs or picking a certain scented candle to establish the mood for writing. Use your other senses to establish a habit that tells your brain to focus. You can think about all that other stuff later.
  3. Are you an indoor/outdoor/at home/out of home writer? If you’re newer to the craft, you may not know where you best write at. Even if you’re a veteran writer, if you’ve hit a wall it might be time to try out different locations to see if your muse likes one location over another. Maybe you write best at home, but revise best at your favorite coffee shop. Whatever the case, don’t be afraid to change up the location.

Just as it’s important to establish good sleep hygiene by turning your phone off and lets thoughts from the day quiet down, it’s just as important to establish good creative space practices. Once you’ve established the habit of writing, it will be easier to sit down and get those words down on paper.